The Connection between Enterprise Architecture and Data Centers

What is the connection between enterprise architecture and something technical as data centers?

In one of his blogs Tom Graves, a well known enterprise architect, is discussing the needs of enterprise architect clients.

According to Tom: “What paying-folks in business and elsewhere want from enterprise-architecture and suchlike is very rarely about theory or anything of that kind – on frameworks, reference-models, schemas and so on. Nope. What they want from us is practical answers to practical business-questions – almost nothing more than that” (emphasis by Tom Graves).

I would add to this that enterprise architecture is all about decision support and gaining insight in certain organisational issues. Depending on the issues (and the main objective one wants to achieve) we can define different work domains with different goals and timelines as shown in the figure below.

EAWorkdomains

The enterprise architect is the one who should help an organization to operate as one, by working towards a common shared vision supported by a well orchestrated set of actions, is to have the capability to create, implement and maintain a coherent enterprise design also known as an enterprise architecture.

The promise of enterprise architecture is that designing an enterprise by applying systematic rational methods will produce an enterprise that is capable to pursues its purposes more effectively and efficiently.

Enabling organisations to make better-informed decisions.

One of the main activities (and one of the main differentiators with other architects) of the enterprise architect should be to help to create insight in the relation between developments in technology and society, and the organization and the impact it has on the strategic, tactical and operational work level of the organization.

Inform, communicate and facilitate are the verbs of the enterprise architect.

Walk the talk

Based on these ideas I wrote a book about data centers. Why?

The last few years the focus of data centers was mainly on IT efficiency. But currently there is much is more at stake than ordinary operational technicalities. Something that not everyone is aware of.

In large parts of the world, computers, Internet services, mobile communication, and cloud computing have become a part of our daily lives, professional and private. Information and communication technology has invaded our life and is recognized as a crucial enabler of economic and social activities across all sectors of our society. The opportunity of anytime, anywhere being connected to communicate and interact and to exchange data is changing the world.

So, during the last two decades, a digital information infrastructure has been created whose functioning is critical to our society, governmental, and business processes and services, which depend on computers. Data centers, buildings to house computer servers along with network and storage systems, are a crucial part of this critical digital infrastructure. They are the physical manifestation of the digital economy and the virtual and digital information infrastructure, were data is processed, stored, and transmitted.

Given the fact that we are living in a world with limited resources and the demand for digital infrastructure is growing exponentially, there will be limits that will be encountered. The limiting factor to future economic development is the availability and the functioning of natural capital. Therefore, we need a new and better industrial model.

Creating sustainable data centers is not a technical problem but an economic problem to be solved.

Therefore organisations have to rethink the “data center equation” of “people, planet, profit”.

With a Cradle-to-Cradle approach we can transform current production systems with linear material flows (make take waste) to production systems with circular materials flows (reuse, recycle and recover). In order to prevent resource depletion, disposal of valuable materials and harmless emissions.

A sustainable data center should be environmentally viable, economically equitable and socially bearable. The combination of service-dominant logic and cradle-to-cradle makes it possible to create a sustainability data center industry.

Data Center 2.0: The Sustainable Data Center is an in-depth look into the steps needed to transform modern-day data centers into sustainable entities (ISBN 978-1499224689).

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